Best Medical Grade Air Purifier (2021 Review)

Are you in the market for a new medical grade air purifier? Perfect!

In this proHVACinfo guide, you will learn the following:

What are medical grade air purifiers? (why they are different)

What are the different types of medical grade air purifier? (learn about HEPA 13)

How do medical grade air purifiers work? (are they different to standard purifiers?)

What do you look for in the best medical grade air purifiers? (features you shouldn’t compromise on)

And much more!

Below you’ll find a quick list of our top 5 recommendations, keep scrolling to learn more!

ImageProduct
digital-business-prep-table__image
Alen BreatheSmart Flex
  • Fast Air Cleaning
  • Economic Operation
  • Lightweight
  • Fast Air Cleaning
  • Economic Operation
  • Lightweight
View on Amazon
digital-business-prep-table__image
Alen BreatheSmart 75i
  • Prefilter Cleanin
  • Excellent Guarantee
  • Child Friendly
  • Prefilter Cleanin
  • Excellent Guarantee
  • Child Friendly
View on Amazon
digital-business-prep-table__image
Levoit H13 Air Purifier
  • User-Friendly Timer
  • Low Running Cost
  • Quiet Operation
  • User-Friendly Timer
  • Low Running Cost
  • Quiet Operation
View on Amazon
digital-business-prep-table__image
Hathaspace Smart True HEPA Purifier
  • Trusted Brand
  • Particle Sensor
  • Extra Large Cleaning Footprint
  • Trusted Brand
  • Particle Sensor
  • Extra Large Cleaning Footprint
View on Amazon
digital-business-prep-table__image
HIMOX H05 Smart Air Purifier
  • Activated Carbon Odor Reduction
  • Strong Shell
  • H13 HEPA Filter
  • Activated Carbon Odor Reduction
  • Strong Shell
  • H13 HEPA Filter
View on Amazon

What Are Medical Grade Air Purifiers?

A medical grade air purifier is one that makes use of the highest levels of filtration available to capture the maximum number of airborne contaminants while still allowing air to flow.

To be medical grade, an air purifier must make use of medical grade HEPA filtration.

Standard HEPA, generally referred to as ‘True’ HEPA filters are found in many residential air purifiers, and are rated between H10 and H12.

To attain this rating, they must be capable of removing 99.97% of particles 0.3 microns in diameter from the air.

In order to be certified as medical grade HEPA, with a rating of H13 to H14, a purifier must be able to capture between 99.95% to 99.995% of the smallest airborne particles of just 0.1 micron.

For comparison, a True HEPA filter would only be able to trap around 85% of those 0.1-micron particles.

What Are The Different Types Of Medical Grade Air Purifiers?

As we briefly mentioned above, in order to be a medical grade air purifier, it does need to have that H13 – H14 HEPA filter.

Having said that, there are some other technologies that medical grade purifiers can have in conjunction with the HEPA filtration to further improve their air improving qualities.

UV Lights

UV light is a known germ killer, which is a definite bonus in a medical grade setting.

In order to work as a sanitizer, though, UV light must be in the UV-C bandwidth.

Within the housing of the purifier, a UV-C lamp will light up the filter media, so not only will bacterial and viral particles be trapped by the HEPA filter, they will be killed.

Activated Charcoal Filtration

Some medical grade purifiers will also feature a second layer of filtration in the form of activated charcoal or carbon.

After undergoing a heat and chemical treatment, carbon particles become porous which allows them to neutralize odors and capture VOCs, which in many cases can be hazardous to health.

The carbon element works by a process of adsorption, in which it causes the impurities to chemically bind to its surface as they pass through the media.

Not only are they now trapped, but the VOCs have their chemical properties changed due to the fact that they are now bound to the carbon, which neutralizes odors, and any other ill-effects.

How do Medical Grade Air Purifiers Work?

There’s a little bit more to the process of HEPA filtration than simply air passing through a screen. There are four principles to filtration, and they are:

Sieving

Sieving is the most basic principle, and is how most people automatically assume a filter works.

With sieving, particles that are too large to pass through any gaps in the filter media are unable to move through, and are therefore captured.

Interception

During interception, any airborne contaminants and particles will be directed toward the fibers of the filter media.

When they come within a single particle radius of the filter fibers, they become attracted to, and stick to those fibers.

Impaction

Impaction relies on the inertia of large, heavier particles in the air flowing through the purifier.

As air enters the purifier and changes direction to pass through the filter media, these heavy particles are unable to change course with the air flow due to their inertia, and they subsequently collide with the filter fibers, where they become trapped.

Diffusion

Things get a bit more scientific here! Particle dynamics dictate that energized molecules will travel in a straight line, that is until they bump into another particle.

Owing to the fact that there are so many small particles moving around and bumping into one another within a room, they actually begin to move randomly.

This is especially true of the smallest particles, those of 0.1 micron or less, which is particularly important for medical grade air purifiers.

Because they are so tiny, they can even bump into, and be moved by gas molecules. This movement actually slows down these high velocity particles, which makes it possible for them to be caught by the HEPA filter media.

What Do You Look For In The Best Medical Grade Air Purifiers?

Shopping for a medical grade air purifier can be a confusing process. There are many machines on the market, and many making some pretty grand claims about their purifying abilities.

If this is the first time you’ve been looking for a medical grade air purifier, you will definitely want to keep an eye out for the following features.

HEPA Certification

This is the first thing you need to look for. Make sure that the device is rated to HEPA H13 or H14.

If it claims to be “True HEPA”, but doesn’t specify the rating, at best it’s going to be H10-H12.

If it says “HEPA Like”, or “HEPA Style”, it’s almost certainly not even HEPA rated at all, and is not appropriate for conditions in which medical grade purification is required.

Particle Removal

This goes hand in hand with HEPA certification, but ensure that the purifier you buy can filter at least 99.95% of particles as small as 0.1 micron.

Build Quality

Given the overall importance of a medical grade air purifier in whatever setting you choose to use it in, it’s vital that you choose a unit that is built to last.

This is especially true for medical-grade air purifiers, as ultrafine filter media like H13 and H14 HEPA filter can put a lot of strain on the fan motors inside the purifier.

Your air purifier is performing one of the most important tasks of any appliance in your home.

Make sure you purchase one that is sturdy enough to see you through years of service.

This is especially important with compact and portable units that are likely to be picked up and handled more frequently.

Ongoing Maintenance

Especially when it comes to air purifiers with specialist filtration media, it’s important to make sure that the ongoing costs are going to be manageable.

Filters don’t last forever, and generally speaking, systems that use generic sized replacements are just as effective, and can be significantly cheaper to run and maintain than those using proprietary sizes and shapes.

Our Reviews Of The Best Medical Grade Air Purifiers

Final Thoughts On The Best Medical Grade Air Purifiers

It is important to remember that these are not medical devices, while they offer similar levels of filtration and purification as devices you’d find in a hospital or doctor’s office, they are not certified to be used for medical reasons.

Having said that, they do offer the same level of filtration as you’d find in those settings, giving you maximum protection and sanitization for the air in your home.

We truly hope you found this latest proHVACinfo guide to be helpful. We had a tough time deciding which of these was deserving of our top awards, but we’re confident that no matter which you choose, you’ll be happy with the results.

Stephen Marks

Stephen Marks

Stephen is an HVAC and home-repair enthusiast. He's here to answer any of your questions about HVAC!

Leave a Comment

Stephen Marks

Stephen Marks

Stephen is an HVAC and home-repair enthusiast. He's here to answer any of your questions about HVAC!

About proHVACinfo

You’ve got HVAC questions. We have the best answers from a network of seasoned pros.

Recently Published Guides